2016-07-25

A solid hammering


When you are reading a book like "Born in Tibet", what you are getting is not so much a description of the country and its history, but what they meant to Chögyam Trungpa and how growing up in Tibet felt like to the author. I should warn you that it is the same with what I am writing here; it cannot prepare you in any way for what you would see and feel and experience on coming to Auroville. My writings do not provide you with facts, either. They rather tell you a lot about what is on the writer's mind, and what this place means to him (and maybe why he uses to talk in the third person about himself).

My fellow Aurovilians may back me up on the fact that, regarding descriptions of the joys and difficulties of living in Auroville, there is a very close connection between the observer's world view and their experience of events in this township. It seems as though Auroville is magnifying psychological challenges, philosophical puzzles, or, if you prefer to express it in these terms, karmic conditions which dominate a person's life. One might say that, in Auroville, you are getting a solid hammering of the exact issues that call for getting resolved.

The intensity of it all seems unbearable, even torturous, sometimes. Auroville, some folks observed, is not exactly the place of smiling people; betrayed of their dreams and bewildered, many choose to leave. But if one is willing to face the heat this pressure from an unknown source can become a powerful drive for working out the issues oneself, finding out what they mean, overcoming the self-inflicted internal suffering, and translating all of that into a way of life in a close-knit community. Irrespective of "Divine Consciousness", " eternal youth", "human unity" and all the rest of it, this is, to me, what AV's four-point-charter is all about, and why the Mother could boil it down to one single, all-inclusive sentence, "All people of goodwill are welcome"...

...to learn how to embrace the other 95%